How to use the State of Global Air interactive data


Welcome! Here you can find out how to create, explore, and download data:

  1. Create plots that compare air quality or health impacts
  2. Download plots and their data
  3. Create global maps of air quality and health impacts
  4. View or download tables with air quality and health impact data

Abbreviations and Regions used in the data tables that are not self-evident are listed at the bottom of this page.
Please refer to the Glossary for additional information.

 

Part 1: Create plots that compare air quality or health impacts

1. Select either the “Air Quality” or “Health Impact” tab. (“Air Quality” is set as the default.) When a tab is selected, the text color will be gold and the tab will be dark blue.

Choose air quality or health

2. Use the menu on the left side of the screen to define the parameters of your search. Parameters for both Air Quality and Health Impact include country, pollutant, comparison region, and sub-comparison region as illustrated below. 

    Choose pollutant or country    Select comparison countries

The health impact search has an additional category of "measures of health burden," which include a choice between deaths (numbers or age-standardized rates) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). These terms are defined in the Glossary and explained in more detail in the Report.

3. Select a pollutant. You can choose ambient particulate matter, ozone, or household air pollution. For health burden there is an additional category, “Air Pollution,” which represents the combined contributions of ambient particulate matter, ozone, and household air pollution.

4. Administrative regions as default. When you select either the Air Quality or Health Impact tabs, “Administrative regions” is selected as the default comparison. For your selected country, the default Administrative region is “GBD region,” and the plot displays data for the GBD subregion into which that country falls. For example, if you select Afghanistan, its GBD subregion is South Asia. By default, the plot will display data for your chosen country and for all countries in the selected region/subregion separately.

If you would like to see how your selected country compares with the entire GBD subregion combined, select the “Aggregated” button underneath the “Select comparison region” dropdown menu.

5. Compare to other administrative regions. Click on the “Select comparison region” dropdown menu and select a new region or grouping. The other comparison regions include GBD superregions, World Health Organization regions, Developed/Developing Countries, Four World Regions, World Bank regions, World Bank Income Levels, European Union countries, G-20 countries, and Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries. More information on these regions or groupings and the countries they include can be found below. To view plots and data for multiple subregions, click within the subregion box and select additional countries/regions.

6. Compare to other individual countries.You can compare your selected country to another individual country or by choosing “Individual countries.” Click on “+Add country” and scroll down to select the country or countries you wish to compare.

7. Add global averages. The line representing global mean levels can be added to any plots by selecting the “Show global averages” check-box underneath the selection menus on the left.

8. Highlight specific data points. If you are interested in the numbers for specific data points, scroll over the data point with your cursor, and the numbers will pop up. 

9. Zoom in on any plot. You can also zoom in on any plot by using the mouse to draw a box around the points of interest. To zoom out, press the “Reset zoom” button in the upper right-hand corner of the plot.

 

Part 2: Download plots and their data

There are a number of ways to download both the plots and the data you worked with in Part 1. The following steps will assist you in obtaining these downloads.

1. To download the image of a plot, select the arrow menu on the top right side of the plot.

2. Select the image download type of your choice. Options include PNG image and JPEG image.

3. If you are interested in downloading the data you see on the plot, select the arrow and then “Download CSV.” (CSV stands for comma separated value, which can be opened in Excel and similar programs).

 

Part 3: Create global maps of air quality and health impacts

This page includes interactive maps to display air quality or health impact for 2016. The following steps will help you utilize their functionality.

1. Select maps. When the site opens, it is set to “Plots” by default. Switch to maps by selecting “Maps” from the tabbed menu above the plots.

2. Choose global air quality maps. Air quality maps can display levels of population-weighted annual average PM2.5 (ambient particulate matter pollution) or ozone (ambient ozone pollution), or household air pollution. PM2.5 is the default pollutant. To change the pollutant, use the “Select Pollutant” dropdown menu.

3. Choose global health burden maps. Select “Health Impact” on the top-left side of the page, and then select “Maps.” Health impact maps can display burden for populated-weighted PM2.5, ozone, household air pollution, or total air pollution (listed as “Air Pollution”).

4. Choose a measure of health burden. Four different health impact metrics are offered: number of deaths, number of DALYs, death rates, or DALY rates. All rates are age-standardized rates per 100,000 population. Choose one in the drop-down menu.

5. View global map. View the global map that launches when the “Maps” tab is selected. Each country is color-coded. The color code is described (including units) in the key to the left of the map. An example map is shown below.

Map example

6. Scroll over to see specific country data. On any map, placing your cursor over a specific country on the map will pop up the data for your selected pollutant or health impact metric for the year 2016.

7. Display selected ranges of exposure or health impact. Click on the ranges in the key to turn the display of countries in the selected range off and on. For example, in the map above, if you’re interested only in displaying countries where the ambient average is between 30 and <45 µg/m3, click on the other ranges to toggle them off. If you’d like to view those ranges again, click on them to toggle them back on.

8. Zoom in. You can zoom in and out on the map using the stacked plus and minus buttons on the top left side of the map.

9. Download. If you are interested in downloading the map image, or downloading map data, use the arrow menu to access that functionality.

Map download arrow

 

 

Part 4: View or download tables with air quality and health impact data

All of the data used to create the line plots are available to search, sort, and download from the site. The tables include data for all years (1990–2016). In addition, the tables includeing  the 95% upper and lower uncertainty intervals for the mean air quality and health impact measures.

1. When the site opens, it is set to “Plots” by default. Switch to tables by selecting “Tables” from the tabbed menu above the plots. 

2. For a table of air quality data or health impact data, set all parameters as you would for creating the plots (see Part 1). The table will display the data based on the parameters selected. For example, if the country of Afghanistan is selected, along with GBD regions, the subregion is automatically South Asia; data for all other countries in South Asia will appear in the data table. You can use the arrows at the top of each column to sort the data.

Table example

 

Abbreviations

Abbreviation Definition
ISO3 Three-letter country codes published by the International Organization for Standardization, to represent countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest.
Exposure lower Lower 95% uncertainty interval of exposure to PM2.5 (µg/m3) or ozone (ppb), or household air pollution (proportion of population exposed)..
Exposure mean PM2.5: Population-weighted annual average, or mean, concentration (µg/m3). 
Ozone: Seasonal average, population-weighted concentration (ppb).
Household air pollution: Proportion of population (%).
Exposure upper Upper 95% uncertainty interval of exposure to PM2.5 (µg/m3) or ozone (ppb), or household air pollution (proportion of population exposed).
Burden lower Lower 95% uncertainty interval of health burden (death or DALYs or their rates) due to PM2.5, ozone, household air pollution, or total air pollution exposure.
Burden mean Average health burden (deaths or DALYs or their rates) due to PM2.5, ozone, household air pollution, or total air pollution exposure.
Burden upper Upper 95% uncertainty interval of health burden (death or DALYs or their rates) due to PM2.5, ozone, household air pollution, or total air pollution exposure.

 

Regions, subregions, and other groupings

Regions Description
G20 countries The Group of Twenty (G20) is the premier international forum for global economic cooperation. Member Countries: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, European Union.
GBD regions IHME created 21 GBD regions based on two criteria: epidemiological similarity and geographical closeness. The regions and the countries included in them can be found on the IHME website.
GBD super-regions IHME established seven super-regions, which group regions on the basis of cause of death patterns, as follows: High income; Latin America & Caribbean; sub-Saharan Africa; North Africa & Middle East; South East Asia, East Asia & Oceania; South Asia; Central Europe, Eastern Europe & Central Asia.
GBD Socio-Demographic Income (SDI) groupings The Sociodemographic Index (SDI) is a summary measure of a geography’s sociodemographic development. It is based on average income per person, educational attainment, and total fertility rate (TFR). SDI contains an interpretable scale: 0 represents the lowest income per capita, lowest educational attainment, and highest TFR observed across all GBD geographies from 1980 to 2016, and 1 represents the highest income per capita, highest educational attainment, and lowest TFR. Groupings: High SDI, high-middle SDI, middle SDI, low-middle SDI, low SDI
World Health Organization regions African region (AFRO), European region (EURO), Region of the Americas (PAHO), South-East Asia Region (SEARO), Western Pacific Region (WPRO), Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMRO) 
Four World regions Four global regions used in the IHME analyses: Asia, Africa, America, Europe
Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Member Countries: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.
European Union Countries 28 Member Countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom
World Bank regions South Asia, East Asia and Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa. The regions and countries included in them can be found on the World Bank website.
World Bank Income Levels High income, Upper middle income, Lower middle income, Low income.